pi 4 - Setting WiFi up via the command line Ubuntu server ...

How to run Bitcoin Core 0.20.0 on Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS using a Raspberry Pi 4 (or Virtual Machine)

I was helping someone on twitter with this so I figured I'd share the information here as well so that other people would have an easier time than I did.
I'm going to explain how to do this setup on a Raspberry Pi, but note that this should work on a VM as well. You can also set up and run the node headless this way, but I will be explaining how to set up the node using a monitor that you can then later disconnect and access remotely once everything is setup.
Hardware:
-Raspberry Pi 4 (2GB RAM minimum) preferably 4GB RAM -Raspberry Pi 4 Heatsinks -Raspberry Pi 4 case -Micro HDMI cable -USB-C power cable and wall adapter -Monitor -Keyboard and mouse -Ethernet cable (Optional) -16GB or larger microSD card -500GB or larger external hard drive (SSD or portable)
Node Requirements: -50 KBps upload internet speeds (Most people should have this) -Unlimited or high data cap internet download/upload service -6 hours or longer per day dedicated run time
Okay, once you have the hardware its time to get started!
The first thing you'll need to do is install the Raspberry Pi imager, this is how we're going to install Ubuntu onto our Raspberry Pi. After your download and install finishes, open the imager.
  1. Click the "choose OS" box and from the list select Ubuntu, then select Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS (Raspberry Pi 2/3/4).
  2. Insert your microSD card to your computer directly or via a USB converter. Click "choose SD card" and select your inserted microSD card.
  3. Click "Write" and wait for the imager to finish flashing the OS onto your card
When it is done, remove the SD card and reinsert it to access the files installed. You can choose the overclock the Raspberry Pi by editing the config file. To connect to the Raspberry Pi remotely, you'll need to create an SSH file. If you're on windows this is pretty easy. In the File Explorer, highlight the address bar at the top, erase the text and type cmd, press enter and the Command Prompt will pop up. Type the following:
echo\ssh
This will create an SSH file in your SD directory so that you can remote access the Rasberry Pi later. Now you can go ahead and eject the SD card from your computer.
Now we can set up the Raspberry Pi
Go ahead and connect all your peripherals to your Raspberry Pi, insert the microSD, and connect it to power to turn it on. Give it a moment to boot up, then when prompted enter "ubuntu" for the password. It will make you change the password. Afterward, it will print a bunch of information to the screen, write down the IPv4 address, this is the IP address you'll use to remote access the Raspberry Pi. Now, at any time you can remote access your Raspberry Pi by entering a terminal on another PC in your network and typing:
ssh [email protected](your IP address)
The next step is to install a desktop. There are plenty to choose from so feel free to use a different one than what I use, you can also choose to ignore this and to just work from in the terminal from this point forward.
You need to update all the repositories so type: (Note you'll either have to be connected by ethernet or have edited the network-config file to setup your wifi in advance)
sudo apt-get update
Once it's done updating type the following to upgrade your system:
sudo apt-get upgrade
Now that you're up-to-date, you can install the desktop using the command:
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-gnome-desktop
This will take a while to download and install so just sit back and let it do its thing. Once it's done downloading, restart your Raspberry Pi and log in with the password you changed earlier. Your first boot may take a while so just be patient, don't freak out if you see a single purple square in the center of the screen while it's loading. You should now have the Ubuntu desktop ready to go and now it's on to installing Bitcoin Core!
Installing Bitcoin Core 0.20.0
Since we're running Ubuntu Server 20.04 LTS, it should come preinstalled with the Snap Store. This makes installing apps very easy and works similar to pip install in Python. Simply open your terminal and type:
sudo snap install bitcoin-core
This will install Bitcoin Core into your Snap folder and will add the application to your system. Unfortunately, there are still a few steps left before we can begin downloading the blockchain. By default, Bitcoin Core doesn't have the removable-media Plug connected to the Socket. You can view this by typing:
snap connections bitcoin-core
This means when you try installing everything onto your external hard drive, Bitcoin Core won't be able to identify it or write to it even when passed the directory path. To fix this first locate your Snap folder, make a copy of the bitcoin-core folder inside, and paste it into your external drive.
NOTE: You must make a copy, you can't just move the snap file to the external drive.
Now, you can connect the removable-media Plug to the Socket by typing:
sudo snap connect bitcoin-core:removable-media :removable-media
This gives you the read/write permissions necessary to access the /media path. Finally, you can now launch Bitcoin Core and select "use a custom directory path" when prompted. Highlight the current directory path and replace it with the path to your external hard drive, it should look something like this:
/media/(external drive)/bitcoin-core/common/.bitcoin
This is why we had to make a copy of the bitcoin-core folder to the external drive earlier, the Bitcoin Core application will create the new data directory through ".bitcoin". Hit "Okay" and the application will begin synchronizing with the network! Once the synchronization is finished your very own node will be up and running!
EDIT: (08/01/2020) Bitcoin Core 0.20.01 has been released, I will update the tutorial soon with how to run the latest release.
submitted by Noblefire_62 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

PiHole 4.2.2 on Synology Docker - setup work for me

PiHole 4.2.2 on Synology Docker - setup work for me
I've setup Pihole on both Synology and Ubuntu with success (lucky me). While on Ubuntu was quite straightforward, on Synology needed some experiment.

I do not activate DHCP function on my Synology; my TPLink wifi router handles it without problem.

My Synology fixed IP is 192.168.2.4 (yours could be different)

On Synology, thanks to this website, https://servicemax.com.au/tips/pi-hole-v4-on-synology-in-docker-the-easy-way/ which gave me 99% success.

Please find below broad steps in setting Pihole version 4.2.2 (latest as at this article) on Synology DSM 6.xx docker:
  1. search Docker registry for 'Pihole', and choose and download 'Pihole/Pihole' which is the official docker from Pihole.
  2. Launch the Pihole image, and use the Advanced setting option to change port mapping and add some environment variables; also check autostart option
  3. Only changes made to the default Pihole container settings:
  • In Port Settings tab, fixed the port mapping for container port 80, 433 to any local port number (I use 8181 and 8182, respectively). For container port 53 tcp and udp, do use 53 for both (local port number must not be duplicated with the same local port numbers being used by other Synology services)
  • In Environment tab, I did two things:
    • change ServerIP value to my Synology fixed IP (192.168.2.4 for my synology)
    • add variable WEBPASSWORD and give your desired admin password (to override default Pihole password automatically)
  • To enter into the Pihole admin website, use this url: 192.168.2.4:8181/admin.

They are all the set up I did on my Synology.

On main Wifi Router
The other setup to do is to change default DNS servers on my main wifi router (TPLink). My ISP assigns DNS1 and DNS2 IP for my router, but the router allows me to manually change them. I changed only the DNS1 value to be my Synology fixed IP address, which is 192.168.2.4; and left the second DNS remains same. From this setup, all devices in my home will be using Pihole services automatically (filter out Ad, porn websites, bitcoin mining....). You may add more blacklist urls under Setting in Pihole admin page.
---------------------------------------------------------
If you don't want Pihole to filter ad for all your devices, you don't have to change the DNS on your main router. Instead, on the device you wish to have Pihole controlled, you can change the first DNS IP to be your Synology IP, mine is 192.168.2.4 (yours could be different); and keeps the second DNS as is (mine is my main router IP which is 192.168.2.1)

Once you completed the setup on both Synology and Router, log into Pihole admin page, see the statistics in Dashboard, it should display Total number of queries, queries blocked, etc... If no movement on these numbers, that means the setup was not right, you can check the Pihole container log on Synology (in DetailsLog tab).

Pihole container consumes only 0.1x% of my DS411+II Atom D525 CPU, and 300+/- MB ram (from 2GB total RAM). I also run full Calibre engine and content server docker without problem on it.

The Pihole on my Ubuntu will be my backup.

Ports mapping: change from Auto
Change ServerIP value and add variable WEBPASSWORD only
Enable auto-restart


Resources usage
submitted by europacafe to pihole [link] [comments]

IMPORTANT wallet advice I think every user should know - don't get burned by not following these tips, it's important to use wallets in a SAFE way!

iOS, Android & Exchange wallets = NOT SECURE enough!

There are RISKS to storing your ETH in an iOS/Android wallet, and you are obligated to TEST YOUR WALLET if you used myetherwallet.com to generate your wallet (their wallets should work just fine but they even tell you to test your wallet before offloading to it). Also if you use freewallet I suggest REMOVING YOUR FUNDS FROM IT ASAP see here for why.
An example: Jax for iOS is a closed source wallet -- all iOS and Android wallets are compiled and sent to the app store. It is impossible to know what got inserted into there by the time you use it. For that reason I strongly encourage not keeping your ether in any iOS or Android wallet and also not keeping your ether in any exchange at. Both wallet apps and exchanges have been hacked or behaved dishonestly in the past and have stolen user bitcoin and ether. I believe the founder of jaxx has said as much as well - that his wallet is designed for convenience and not for large or long term storage!
you may think I am paranoid, however:
  1. here is an iOS wallet that just stole 8 million dollars from its users - this could happen to jaxx or any, any wallet you download from the app store
  2. here is a user who lost $50,000 because he generated a wallet at myetherwallet without first testing sending and receiving money
It is very important that you:
  1. generate a wallet from a source that you absolutely trust and that you
  2. store that wallet in a secure environment and that you
  3. test that wallet before sending all your ether to it.
If you search the sub you will discover some horror stories from folks who failed to follow through with these steps. They are not overly hard but are extremely important towards securing your investment.
FAILURE TO COMPLY with these pieces of advice may result in the absolute and total loss or inaccessibility of your ether, and in such a circumstance your ether is both non-recoverable and you are fully liable for the loss.

How to generate a wallet in a safe way: air gapped paper wallet

  1. get a USB stick and create a bootable version of ubuntu, there are many guides on how to do this. Here is one for Windows Users. Here is one for Mac users. Here is a video on YouTube for how to do it. By the end of this first step you should have a USB stick that you can boot Ubuntu from.
  2. download this website from here. Extract the contents of this zip to a folder on a flash drive. You can use the same flash drive that you just created for Ubuntu, just make a folder such as flashdrive/myetherwallet and stick the website contents in there
  3. You have to now boot your computer from the USB stick. Mac users can just insert the USB stick, hold option, power up their computer and then select "Ubuntu live cd" or "ubuntu". Windows users have to follow these steps with the usb stick inserted and then pick the usb stick from a list of boot options.
  4. at some point booting from the usb stick, select "live cd" or "try ubuntu before installing". NEVER EVER SETUP WIFI, UNPLUG YOUR INTERNET CORD IF YOU ARE WIRED IN!
  5. once ubuntu boots, find the flash drive in the file explorer with the website, and open up index.html
  6. think up a password (you absolutely shouldnt forget this) and click "generate wallet". Then click "download keystore file" and find the file that got downloaded and STICK THIS ON THE FLASH DRIVE - you absolutely shouldnt lose this!
  7. write down the private key that they give you. Write it on paper, double and triple check it. Copy it to a text file and save it onto the flash drive. You absolutely shouldnt lose this!
  8. you shouldnt print your wallet unless you can connect to a usb printer. Otherwise you would need network access to print. What you can do though is click on "print", cancel the print dialogue and then go to "file > save" and save the webpage on your flash disk.
  9. click next, select "Keystore File (UTC / JSON)" and then "select a file" and open the .json file you saved on the flash disk earlier
  10. you have now generated a wallet. Nice job. I highly suggest you now insert a second flash disk and copy EVERYTHING from the first one onto the second. Then store them in different places. The idea here is that you make several copies of your public and private key so you don't lose them.
  11. NEVER EVER PLUG THESE USB STICKS INTO ANOTHER COMPUTER AGAIN - only access these USB sticks from ubuntu, booting it up the same way you did in the steps above ^
  12. You should now try sending something small like 0.001 ETH to this new wallet, and then use http://etherscan.io to make sure the transfer goes through.
  13. You should now try sending 0.001 ETH out of your new wallet to make sure it works. You should only ever send money from this new wallet by booting Ubuntu up and sticking the USB sticks into your computer. From an online computer go here and put your new wallet's public address in, then click "generate information" and copy down gas price and nonce to a textfile on A NEW usb stick. Go back to your offline computer with ubuntu and open up index.html again and click "Send Offline" on the navigation at the top. Where it says "Step 2" insert the to address of your old wallet, and put 0.001 in for value, and then fill in gas price and nonce from the text file you saved on that new usb stick. Check the "keystore JSON" box and click "SELECT WALLET FILE" and give it the .json file you saved from step 6. It will now give you some long string of text. SAVE THIS TO THAT NEW USB STICK DONT REUSE THE ONE WITH THE .JSON FILE AND YOUR PRIVATE KEY! Stick this new USB stick into another computer, go here again, in the box labeled "signed transaction" paste that text you just saved in and click "send transaction". BOOM.
if this works then you now a) know your brand spanking new wallet works and b) know how to do a super secure offline transaction - hackers be damned you're pretty secure and safe now!

Hardware wallet

I believe an air gap generated paper wallet is the most secure approach, but if you want a hardware wallet I would read up on the Ledger and the TREZOR, although these are difficult to find right now due to large demand.
submitted by dont_forget_canada to ethtrader [link] [comments]

My experience setting up a full node at home. Specs, setup time and running costs

As an anecdotic data point, here is my experience setting up a full node at home. Your mileage may vary of course.
Step one: Install full node software and do the initial blockchain download. Three simple commands on my desktop PC:
$ wget https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/downloads/bitcoinUnlimited-1.0.0.1-linux64.tar.gz $ tar xzf bitcoinUnlimited-1.0.0.1-linux64.tar.gz $ ./bitcoinUnlimited-1.0.0/bin/bitcoind -dbsize=8000 
The initial block download completed in 9 hours. By the end of it, my ~/.bitcoin directory was 112GB. A few notes about the setup:
I used the "-dbsize" parameter to give half of the RAM to bitcoind process for caching. Not sure how much difference that made. I would characterize the PC as midrange / "sweet spot" system. Any serious "enthusiast" system would have a more recent CPU, possibly more RAM, and a faster SSD.
Step two: set up a separate, always-running system
The PC above is my day-to-day work machine which I sometimes dual boot, and sometimes leave turned off. For the full node, I wanted a separate, low-power system that would be running 24/7. I went to the local Craigslist-equivalent and bought an used laptop for €50. The laptop has Intel Core 2 Duo processor @ 1.6GHz, 1GB RAM and 320GB spinning disk. My reasoning for it was:
I installed Ubuntu 16.04 server edition on the laptop, transferred the ~/.bitcoin directory from my main PC (took about 3 hours over a 100Mbps ethernet connection) and started bitcoind. Forwarded the 8333 port on the router, and it's done.
Power usage at wall: 20W. That's below €1/mo in electricity costs. Marginal cost of accepting 2MB blocks or 32MB blocks: €0 (until the laptop runs out of disk space)
submitted by medieval_llama to btc [link] [comments]

IMPORTANT safety advice for new users - know how to store your ETH safely so you don't lose it!

this is a repost from my old guide BUT we have a lot more new users so I thought it was important to re-iterate through this advice:
https://www.reddit.com/ethtradecomments/6h46qw/important_wallet_advice_i_think_every_user_should/

iOS, Android & Exchange wallets = NOT SECURE enough!

There are RISKS to storing your ETH in an iOS/Android wallet, and you are obligated to TEST YOUR WALLET if you used myetherwallet.com to generate your wallet (their wallets should work just fine but they even tell you to test your wallet before offloading to it). Also if you use freewallet I suggest REMOVING YOUR FUNDS FROM IT ASAP see here for why.
An example: Jax for iOS is a closed source wallet -- all iOS and Android wallets are compiled and sent to the app store. It is impossible to know what got inserted into there by the time you use it. For that reason I strongly encourage not keeping your ether in any iOS or Android wallet and also not keeping your ether in any exchange at. Both wallet apps and exchanges have been hacked or behaved dishonestly in the past and have stolen user bitcoin and ether. I believe the founder of jaxx has said as much as well - that his wallet is designed for convenience and not for large or long term storage!
you may think I am paranoid, however:
  1. here is an iOS wallet that just stole 8 million dollars from its users - this could happen to jaxx or any, any wallet you download from the app store
  2. here is a user who lost $50,000 because he generated a wallet at myetherwallet without first testing sending and receiving money
It is very important that you:
  1. generate a wallet from a source that you absolutely trust and that you
  2. store that wallet in a secure environment and that you
  3. test that wallet before sending all your ether to it.
If you search the sub you will discover some horror stories from folks who failed to follow through with these steps. They are not overly hard but are extremely important towards securing your investment.
FAILURE TO COMPLY with these pieces of advice may result in the absolute and total loss or inaccessibility of your ether, and in such a circumstance your ether is both non-recoverable and you are fully liable for the loss.

How to generate a wallet in a safe way: air gapped paper wallet

  1. get a USB stick and create a bootable version of ubuntu, there are many guides on how to do this. Here is one for Windows Users. Here is one for Mac users. Here is a video on YouTube for how to do it. By the end of this first step you should have a USB stick that you can boot Ubuntu from.
  2. download this website from here. Extract the contents of this zip to a folder on a flash drive. You can use the same flash drive that you just created for Ubuntu, just make a folder such as flashdrive/myetherwallet and stick the website contents in there
  3. You have to now boot your computer from the USB stick. Mac users can just insert the USB stick, hold option, power up their computer and then select "Ubuntu live cd" or "ubuntu". Windows users have to follow these steps with the usb stick inserted and then pick the usb stick from a list of boot options.
  4. at some point booting from the usb stick, select "live cd" or "try ubuntu before installing". NEVER EVER SETUP WIFI, UNPLUG YOUR INTERNET CORD IF YOU ARE WIRED IN!
  5. once ubuntu boots, find the flash drive in the file explorer with the website, and open up index.html
  6. think up a password (you absolutely shouldnt forget this) and click "generate wallet". Then click "download keystore file" and find the file that got downloaded and STICK THIS ON THE FLASH DRIVE - you absolutely shouldnt lose this!
  7. write down the private key that they give you. Write it on paper, double and triple check it. Copy it to a text file and save it onto the flash drive. You absolutely shouldnt lose this!
  8. you shouldnt print your wallet unless you can connect to a usb printer. Otherwise you would need network access to print. What you can do though is click on "print", cancel the print dialogue and then go to "file > save" and save the webpage on your flash disk.
  9. click next, select "Keystore File (UTC / JSON)" and then "select a file" and open the .json file you saved on the flash disk earlier
  10. you have now generated a wallet. Nice job. I highly suggest you now insert a second flash disk and copy EVERYTHING from the first one onto the second. Then store them in different places. The idea here is that you make several copies of your public and private key so you don't lose them.
  11. NEVER EVER PLUG THESE USB STICKS INTO ANOTHER COMPUTER AGAIN - only access these USB sticks from ubuntu, booting it up the same way you did in the steps above ^
  12. You should now try sending something small like 0.001 ETH to this new wallet, and then use http://etherscan.io to make sure the transfer goes through.
  13. You should now try sending 0.001 ETH out of your new wallet to make sure it works. You should only ever send money from this new wallet by booting Ubuntu up and sticking the USB sticks into your computer. From an online computer go here and put your new wallet's public address in, then click "generate information" and copy down gas price and nonce to a textfile on A NEW usb stick. Go back to your offline computer with ubuntu and open up index.html again and click "Send Offline" on the navigation at the top. Where it says "Step 2" insert the to address of your old wallet, and put 0.001 in for value, and then fill in gas price and nonce from the text file you saved on that new usb stick. Check the "keystore JSON" box and click "SELECT WALLET FILE" and give it the .json file you saved from step 6. It will now give you some long string of text. SAVE THIS TO THAT NEW USB STICK DONT REUSE THE ONE WITH THE .JSON FILE AND YOUR PRIVATE KEY! Stick this new USB stick into another computer, go here again, in the box labeled "signed transaction" paste that text you just saved in and click "send transaction". BOOM.
if this works then you now a) know your brand spanking new wallet works and b) know how to do a super secure offline transaction - hackers be damned you're pretty secure and safe now!

Hardware wallet

I believe an air gap generated paper wallet is the most secure approach, but if you want a hardware wallet I would read up on the Ledger and the TREZOR, although these are difficult to find right now due to large demand.
submitted by dont_forget_canada to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

New Lab for New Home

For the longest time my home lab had consisted of an old gaming PC with 32GB of RAM with the GPU taken out. It wasn't all that flash, but it was good enough to spin up a few VMs. Strapped for money as a poor uni student I could only dream of having something more powerful, with more IO, more CPU and at the very least 2 NICs!
Fast forward to today. No longer a port uni student and have now built ourselves a nice new house and I (of course) got the blokes building it to run CAT6 (2 cables) to every room and terminate all the cables in the storage room to a patch panel.
But I was still stuck with my old gaming PC as a server, a NETGEAR WIFI "Something" and a little 8 port unmanaged switch. All that shit had to go!
A complete rebuild was required to put all those CAT6 cables to good use (10Gbps can wait a bit though)
I ended up with the following. Everything was brand new except the NUCs, the BX100 and the Seagate hard drives (Salvaged from an old ReadyNAS):
New Server:
Devices:
Server Software:
The server is running Hyper-V (Windows Server 2016 Core). All storage is configured using Microsoft Storage spaces which has been working great. The SSDs aren't redundant, but I'm using them primarily for LAB stuff and OS disks.
Purpose of the NUCs:
PFSense:
I've been using PFSense for maybe 5 years. never picked up a gold subscription, so figured I'd buy one of their premade appliances and support them. I couldn't be happier. The SG-2440, although on dated hardware still manages to push 1Gbps across its interfaces even with Snort activated. Works great, handles VLAN and routing extremely well.
Ubiquiti:
The Ubiquiti stuff speaks for itself. The switch does most of the heavy lifting and inter-lan communication. The AP-AC Pro is of course the wireless bridge to get all these data hungry mobile devices on the internet.
UPS:
The UPS has been tested and I get around 38 minutes of battery power for the whole setup which is more than enough. Super happy with that purchase. According to the UPS the whole setup uses 140w per hour.
Thoughts:
The server is now running loads of VMs. Everything from a Bitcoin full node to a few personal websites. All is well and running smoothly. Heaps of room to grow.
Having everything running on Windows Core (Apart from the Linux VMs!!) has kept patching down to a minimum which is fantastic. The family are extremely happy with Plex and the Wifi. So all is good.
Now, back to labbing!
Pictures: Everything is sitting on an IKEA bedside table. Can't have everything :D
http://imgur.com/gallery/OYWym
submitted by knixx to homelab [link] [comments]

Time for a Game Plan

As we seem to be bouncing off some kind of bottom, with a backlog of good news about growth and capital, it feels like reality may be conspiring to set off another rise and for this I wanted to set out a game plan. Not a plan for making a shitload of money though that may be possible, a plan that has little to do with following every twist and turn of Bitcoin, but a plan that focuses on life and happiness. How can you survive a rise with some semblance of a normal life?
The price has been climbing for a week straight and while it could turn down any time, shit happens fast, and like an ER technician, you're going to need to react and depend on your mental preparedness to keep you from doing stupid things. You may be compelled to act in strange ways, not all of them positive. So these are some tips to survive another Bitcoin bubble, and Bitcoin itself on a personal, whole-life level.
  1. Keep a clear head. Yeah, I know, "Don't tell me what to do, man!" Quit doing whatever drugs you are doing and don't get into any new ones. During this time, increases may be adding thousands to your net worth in days, hours and minutes. Now, I don't know your particular relationship to money but each of us has a more complicated one than we can actively comprehend. Money is power. Time is money. It's heavy stuff. Time and bitcoins are things that, once wasted, you can't get back. When you find yourself with more money, even on paper it affects where you think you fit in the world, how you think of the future, what you can afford, your risk tolerance. I don't think most of us are setup to deal with so many things changing with that number so quickly. You will want a clear head to be able to follow whatever plan you setup and to deal with curveballs.
  2. Seek healthy ways to handle stress. This will reduce your chances of choosing less-healthy coping methods that sacrifice your intellectual clarity for short-term relief. Exercise. Meditate. Get a massage. Take up a hobby. Exercising the creative areas of your brain helps reduce, relieve, and process stress. Writing, coding, drawing, painting, sculpting, and cooking each provide an opportunity to do something new and to relieve tension. Carry a notebook to capture your ideas. Seek out challenging tasks. Spend time in natural settings with sunlight if you can find it.
  3. Keep your commitments. You don't need to calculate your net worth every hour. When the bubble is over and volatility reduces, you'll have normal life to deal with and you'll find money can't solve every problem it's possible to create during a fit of reckless exuberance. Keeping your committments means not allowing the market to reprioritize your schedule on short notice. People inevitably depend on you for things so keep doing those things. Trust takes years to build, seconds to break, and forever to repair. I speak from experience having effectively quit my job in a suboptimal way.
  4. Increase your security knowledge and improve your security practices. Any funds in online wallets should be minimized to just what is needed for trading. Reduce amounts stored in your own hot wallets to a minimum. Have a process to check and adjust this weekly or more often depending on just how much you're dealing with and your risk tolerance. Hacking attempts increase with the rise in price. 1 BTC sitting on a server at $200 is different than 1 BTC sitting on a server at $500 or $1000. The danger gloriously multiplies if one, ten, or one hundred BTC are currently within your comfort zone. Get a trezor or pick up an old laptop and repurpose it to run Tails or Ubuntu from a CD only (usually you can pull the hard drive and wifi card with just a screw driver). Prepare cold storage wallets, test them, and learn how to store them securely. Learn about BIP38, Shamir's secret sharing, encrypted disks, safes, and safe deposit boxes. If you can reduce your chances of being hacked, it's probably worth the time spent beefing up defenses.
  5. Prepare for taxation. Learn about capital gains tax. Besides federal or national capital gains tax, your state, province, county, or cell block may have additional tax to pay during profitable sales. Know your tax liability before you trade so you understand how much you need to set aside for the man.
  6. Be careful talking about your holdings or the profits you have tallied up on paper. When in doubt, don't talk about it. Techies are generally helpful people and when we think we've cracked the not-being-a-millionaire problem, it's very tempting to help others benefit. Unfortunately the ideal case, where you recommend someone "get in on this", they do, and then they sell for a quick profit seldom happens. More likely is that they buy at the top and hodl, blaming you for every nanosecond they are negative, possibly ending the nightmare by panic selling. And if they are wise enough to hold off on possibly purchasing at the peak, they'll either taunt you for being rich or will berate you for not acheiving stable lunar orbit. It's a no-win situation.
  7. Prepare for a rise ahead of time. Develop a version of this plan for yourself that you can follow or ignore with prejudice.
Hope it helps. Stay safe people.
submitted by zombiecoiner to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My network is possessed... I am convinced.

Hello smart network people of reddit! I could use some direction as I am completely out of options on my end. Take a seat, this will be a story....
I have comcast (yes I know). We have been experiencing intermittent connectivity for 5+ years. However, just the past few months it has gotten much worse. We will experience small outages (about 2 to 4 minutes) approximately 4-9 times a day.
This is my setup currently...
Modem: Their XB3 modem in bridged mode
Router: D'link gaming router
switch: cisco 24 port 10/100/1000 switch
Almost everything in my home is hard wired. The only devices that are wireless are our phones, tablets, and one laptop on occasion. I also have another router set up as a wireless access point downstairs.
I also run a bitcoin miner on my computer (windows 10) and have a media server (ubuntu 14.04) running plex. During these "outages" i can ping my router 192.168.0.10 and get a response. However, sometimes i can ping the modem 10.0.0.1 and others I cant.
Sometimes my galaxy s5 gets an unable to resolve dns. I have it set to google dns through the router 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 However, while this was occurring the laptop was still able to browse reddit just fine both were connected to the same wifi access point.
The bitcoin miner will send me a report letting me know that my miners have gone from OK to Low several times a day. Sometimes during these outages I will ping away and not get a report from my bitcoin miner.
Just a few minutes ago my fiance was on my shared drive and coping a file. He lost access to my computer and these are hard wired connections. Again, I could ping the router but not the modem.
I know in theory my internal network should always remain up. We could not have a modem and still have a LAN Party and not lose connection.
We have had 6 different modems mailed out to us and with each I have tried using their modem as a modem/router and then put it in bridged mode. The intermittent connections still continue.
We got the basic cable because it was cheaper than internet alone and we noticed some hesitation while on a music channel. This turned in to periodic silence or a good remix.
We called comcast and had a technician come out and they verified all cables were good and the signal is fine coming to the house. In fact it was "above par".
We had the line coming to the house replaced and we are still getting intermittent connections. I did a speed test once right after a reconnect and had a lovely 6 mbps connection. We pay for 50 mbps. Alas, after 5 minutes it was back up to a reasonable speed of 75 mbps. I am at wits end. I have replaced everything including the switch. My router gives me some interesting logs which include some blocking of tcp and udp but no log entry of the disconnect. It will say that my status for being online will be renewed right after an outage.
Please share your infinite knowledge. I am tempted to turn my ubuntu server into a dhcp server as I just found another lan card floating around. Thank you for your time!
UPDATE: While looking in my router per u/ShagNasticator_ 's suggestion my connectivity timed out again. I was trying to download some logs that I found. Here are the logs:
2015/9/1 02:42:04 Notice [Dhcpc][2861]: erouter0 got new IP XX.XXX.XXX.XXX
2015/8/31 21:28:17 Notice [Dhcpc][8698]: erouter0 got new IP XX.XXX.XXX.XXX
2015/8/31 21:23:52 Critical [Docsis][527]: No Ranging Response received - T3 time-out
2015/8/31 21:23:52 Critical [Docsis][527]: No Ranging Response received - T3 time-out
2015/8/31 21:23:52 Critical [Docsis][527]: No Ranging Response received - T3 time-out
2015/8/31 21:23:52 Critical [Docsis][527]: No Ranging Response received - T3 time-out
2015/8/31 21:23:52 Critical [Docsis][527]: Unicast Ranging Received Abort Response - initializing MAC
2015/8/31 21:23:51 Critical [Docsis][527]: Unicast Ranging Received Abort Response - initializing MAC
2015/8/31 21:23:51 Critical [Docsis][527]: Unicast Ranging Received Abort Response - initializing MAC
2015/8/31 21:23:51 Critical [Docsis][527]: Unicast Ranging Received Abort Response - initializing MAC
2015/8/31 02:39:27 Notice [Dhcpc][1383]: erouter0 got new IP XX.XXX.XXX.XXX
While trying to download the logs the connectivity timed out. So I went to my router. This was what the router showed:
Please wait while we assess the network.
The modems page then looked like this:
This webpage is not available ERR_CONNECTION_TIMED_OUT
Then I went back to my router page and it showed this:
Connection Type: DHCP Client
QoS Engine : Active
Cable Status: Connected
Network Status : Established
Connection Up Time: 0 Day 0 Hour 00 Min 19 Sec
Now what I find interesting is that the cable modem shows that I got a new IP. But the router still reflects the old IP.
This is my new update..
submitted by mclassy3 to HomeNetworking [link] [comments]

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